Welcome

Welcome to the Thrasher Family Association web page

Members of the Thrasher Family Association are primarily descended from the southern branches of the Thrasher family, although all Thrashers are welcome.  Most trace their roots back to John Thrasher and Ruth Cloud, but some are descendants of Benjamin Thrasher of Maryland or of one of the Isaac Thrasher lines from Tennessee. John Thrasher was first established in Goochland County, Virginia, which was formed from Henrico County in 1727.  The Cloud family were English Quakers who first settled in Pennsylvania.  The Thrashers later migrated to Georgia and from there went to Alabama, Florida, Tennessee and other areas of the South. Still others migrated West, settling in Missouri, Colorado and adjacent states.

You are invited to explore our website. Just click on the tabs along the top or on things that interest you in the Table of Contents to the right. If you are a member of the TFA and want to access our password protected Member Directory, call, text or email me and I will give you the password. My contact information is on the right.

The Thrasher Family Association publishes a newsletter four times a year and holds an annual reunion in the Spring.  Membership dues, which include the newsletter subscription and the member directory, are $20 per year. For more information about membership contact the Thrasher Family Association Treasurer, Robert P. “Buddy” Thrasher by clicking here: Robert Thrasher

                                 Honoring our Thrasher Mothers

We would like to ask members to mail or email a picture of their mother.  Email to: drsuethrasher@gmail.com or mail to Thrasher Newsletter, 1101 Christian Drive, Watkinsville, GA 30677. Never fear: if you mail a picture, I will scan it and return it to you. Then all you need to do is identify your mother and her husband, and list the names of the children, grandchildren, or great grandchildren (we just want it to be up-to-date). If your mother’s maiden or married name is not Thrasher, add a sentence about the “Thrasher connection,” such as “my mother’s grandmother was a Thrasher” or “She is the grand-niece of so-and-so Thrasher.”